Yankees Tweets of the Day: Gleyber Days (vs Orioles)

Start Spreading The News on the Bronx Beat Podcast Episode 204

Start Spreading The News’s own Andy Singer joined EJ Fagan, friend of the blog and host of Baseball Prospectus’s Bronx Beat Podcast, to discuss the Trade Deadline, post-deadline injuries, and the current state of the roster. Enjoy!

The Time for Frazier is Now

The Time for Frazier is Now

As the entire Yankee Universe is aware by now, the Yankees did not go out and supplement the current roster at the trade deadline. No matter what I or anyone else thinks, Brian Cashman as said that true upgrades either were not available to the extent that outside observers thought, or in cases in which upgrades were available, the prices to acquire said upgrades were too expensive to be worthwhile. Cashman has stated that he believes upgrades to the current roster are available within the current organization. While much discussion has focused around the growing cast of thousands that currently reside on the Injured List, very little time has been spent talking about a player who has been conspicuously absent from the roster in recent weeks: Clint Frazier.

(Photo Courtesy of Ken Blaze - USA TODAY Sports)

Read More

Yanks Even the Series with a Bang: Yankees 8, Rays 3

Yanks Even the Series with a Bang: Yankees 8, Rays 3

Prior to tonight’s game, the Yankees had been in the midst of a slight power outage, at least when one considers the rate at which teams have been hitting homers in 2019. The Yankees decided to make up for lost time, riding the long ball and a strong outing by CC Sabathia to come back late to beat the Rays 3-2, and even their 4-game series at 1 apiece. In addition to the fireworks created by the bats, the benches cleared between the top and bottom half of the inning, so you could say that this game had a little bit of everything, bust most importantly, the Yankees can start a new winning streak now.

(Photo Credit: Al Bello/Getty Images)

Read More

Ending the First Half: A Run Too Short for Game 88

Ending the First Half: A Run Too Short for Game 88

The baseball world is very interesting, given that we consider the season to be at its “halfway point” once the All-Star Break occurs, and the actual halfway point (the 81st game) seems to fly by without much fanfare.

This season, the Yankees at their halfway point have now finished 88 games. The team that has played the most games, the Seattle Mariners, have played 94 games. (The Detroit Tigers have played the least games at 85.) A 9-game difference between the most and least games played, and as I’ll come to state often in this recap, each game matters.

The Yankees are currently on pace to win 105 games this season at their current pace (well, 104.93 technically), so it is hard to complain at this point in the season. Add in how the 538 Prediction Model has them with a 98% chance to make the playoffs, and I’ll seem crazy.

Yet, with only a 87% chance to win the division- and skip the dreaded 1-game playoff- every win counts. And today, the Yankees may have given one win up.

Read More

A Player-By-Player Game Recap From the Yankees 17-13 London Win Over the Red Coats

A Player-By-Player Game Recap From the Yankees 17-13 London Win Over the Red Coats

In the first ever MLB sanctioned game played in Europe, the Yankees and the Red Sox combined to do some amazing (and other absolutely terrible) things.

Of the amazing things, the two teams combined to score 30 runs, rack up 37 hits, put up four separate half innings scoring 6 runs, all while not committing a single error over 4 hours and 42 minutes of baseball.

Of the terrible things, neither starting pitcher, Rick Porcello or Masahiro Tanaka was able to pitch through the first inning, which ended up taking an hour of time by itself, and each team needed to use 8 pitchers to get through 9 innings of baseball.

However, the most terrible thing was that the time it felt like the Yankees had easily secured the victory were too short. Especially with them having leads of 6 and 11 runs at separate points during the game.

I truly don’t know if what I watched yesterday was a baseball game or a real life, international exhibition to mimic a kid turning a video game to easy mode, but because the Yankees won I can’t be upset.

Read More

Trading Torres for Scherzer: A Thought Experiment

Trading Torres for Scherzer: A Thought Experiment

Following the posting of yesterday’s Weekly Mailbag, a spirited discussion took place in the comments section regarding who the Yankees should shield in any trade talks for Max Scherzer.  In a short comment within the Mailbag, I expressed my opinion that Gary Sanchez, Aaron Judge, and Gleyber Torres are the only players that I consider off-limits in trade discussions should Scherzer hit the market.  Longtime reader, Fuster, asked me to explain why I would not include Torres in talks for an ace like Scherzer.  While I answered the question in short-form in the comments section, I think that this topic is worth further discussion since the Yankees will be on the prowl for a top-end rotation arm to add to the roster via trade prior to the trade deadline in July.

Before I get into it, I want to make one thing clear: personally, I do not believe that Scherzer will hit the market this summer.  The Nationals still have a chance to come back in the NL East race, and this may be the last season of their window of contention.  Anthony Rendon is a Free Agent this offseason, Scherzer and Strasburg, as good as they are, are getting older, and there is not enough young talent in the National’s prospect pipeline to keep the team in contention without high-end veterans.  I just have a hard time believing that the Nationals will sell at the deadline unless they do something horrific like lose 15 of their next 20 games.  Could it happen?  Sure, which will make this article relevant.  If the Nats sell, it is going to take some serious offers to grab Scherzer.

There are valid reasons on both sides of the argument for and against building a trade offer around Gleyber Torres in pursuit of Max Scherzer.  If I were Brian Cashman, and I had a trade offer centered around Torres that I knew would be accepted by the Nationals, assuming money and prospects were agreed upon, I would be rendered an anxious, sleepless wreck.  But in the end, much as I really do believe that Scherzer is the best pitcher in baseball, I would not be willing to trade Torres in any deal for Max Scherzer.  Let’s dig into it.

(Photo Credit: Getty Images)

Read More