Kit Kat, Part II (It took much longer than I ever expected it would...)

Some readers may remember the story I shared last year about my son Ethan and I and how we used a Giancarlo Stanton home run and Kit Kats to bridge the miles between home and college.

I decided that this was an exercise worth repeating, so, with tears in my eyes, I snuck a Kit Kat into Ethan’s belongings as we packed the car on August 16 to bring him back to school to begin his Junior year at Lafayette College.

I fully anticipated that we’d have the opportunity to share Kit Kats from across the miles in short enough order. It wasn’t to be. I dropped off Ethan 36 days ago. In that time, the Kit Kat sat in Ethan’s dorm room refrigerator. It waited, and Ethan waited, for Giancarlo Stanton to get in the line-up and start hitting bombs. I am quite certain, with the rigors of college life that it would have been easy for Ethan to just give up the whole idea of saving the Kit Kat - a college kid gets hungry and a candy bar can be a delicious and most wonderful treat. But Ethan held strong…

This afternoon, we finally got the chance to enjoy the delicious candy. Ethan announced the good news in a text:

A short while later, after I returned from the store, and Ethan returned to his dorm room from the library where he was studying (albeit while also following the Yankees), we got to celebrate Stanton’s first post-college drop-off homer, together, 77 miles apart…

I’m glad Giancarlo finally delivered. Let’s hope it’s the first of many more!

(Love ya’ Ethan!)

Guest Post by Keith R.A. DeCandido - Remembering Thurman Munson

Guest Post by Keith R.A. DeCandido - Remembering Thurman Munson

A few weeks ago we ran a contest for a free t-shirt from Smack Apparel. We asked readers to let us know who their favorite player was and why. Keith R.A. DeCandido shared the following with us and is allowing us to run his answer as a special guest post.

Keith R.A. DeCandido is an author of more than fifty novels, a hundred short stories, a mess of comic books, and a ton of nonfiction.

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“In 1977, I became a hardcore baseball fan, and it didn't take long for me to zero in on Thurman Munson as my favorite player. Part of it was because he was the team captain, part of it was because he was great fun to watch, part of it was because I thought the catcher was the most important person on the field. I also hated the fact that everyone talked more about Johnny Bench than Munson, which struck me as unfair to ol' Thurm…”

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Jim Bouton

Jim Bouton

The extraordinary thing about Jim Bouton for me was not the influence he had on me as baseball fan, writer and indeed human being, but that he had a similar effect on so many other baseball fans with whom I have become good friends. The single most important indicator of whether or not I will really connect with another baseball person is whether they have read and appreciated Bouton’s seminal book Ball Four. My sons are now young men, but when they were boys of about 12 years old, I did not make them read Ball Four. However, I did make it clear that if they wanted to continue to be fed and housed, they should read the book. They did and they loved it too.

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